Third Grade

MONA…LISA…MONA…LISA! Hello elementary artists! I miss you all and hope you are excited to continue our art adventures at home! Each week I will have a new art challenge for you to explore! You can use whatever art materials you have available, just ask your parent’s permission first! If you can only find pencils and paper, you will still be able to create! Even Van Gogh worked with limited supplies, and he became a famous artist! For some of the activities you will even be using things you find in your house or outside in nature! Now, let’s pretend we are standing at the white table, on a dot, surrounded by all our friends. My directions are coming up next, so here we go! Have fun creating, artists!

**All third-grade art portfolios have been organized and will go home with students when pick up is allowed at the school.**

FINAL WEEK: OPTIONAL FUN ART ACTIVITIES

For our final week I have complied a collection of optional fun art activities and websites to explore! You can choose one that interests you the most or try all of them! I am so proud of how hard you have worked and all of the amazing art you have created! This week just HAVE FUN!

RECREATE A FAMOUS ART PIECE:

We have explored many different artists and art pieces these past few weeks. Now is your chance to recreate any famous art piece. It can be a famous painting or even a sculpture. There are many ways to recreate a famous piece of art. You can use costumes and clothing and try to pose like a person in a famous painting. You can use paint or collage and try to recreate the colors and objects you see in a painting. You could even use things you find outside in nature to recreate a famous painting! The possibilities are endless, but I have added a few examples of how to recreate famous art pieces below to give you some ideas! I have also added a few of my favorite art pieces that you can choose to recreate, or if you have your own favorite you can choose that!

Some of Mrs. Bond’s Favorites:

     

Van Gogh “Starry Night”                              Degas “Two Dancers”

     

Keith Haring “Best Buddies”                     Edvard Munch “The Scream”

Recreation Examples:

   

                                     

SALT DOUGH CLAY RECIPE:

Because many of us did not get to complete our clay projects this year I am posting an easy at home recipe for air dry clay. You can create anything you want out of the clay, and once your sculpture has dried you can even paint it! Enjoy!

Recipe:

½ cup of flour

¼ cup of water

¼ cup of salt

food coloring (optional)

**Depending on how wet or dry your clay is you can add more water or more flour. The clay should not be so sticky that it sticks to your hands, but also not too dry that it falls apart.**

TATE KIDS:

Tate Modern is a modern art museum in London, England. They have an amazing kids’ website where you can make, explore, watch videos, and even play games. I made this painting through their “tate paint” game! Have fun exploring their galleries!

Tate Kids Website

SCULPTURE SCAVENGER HUNT:

Use this map to lead you on a hunt for sculpture supplies!

I am always available via email with any questions you might have. Happy creating artists and I hope you have a fantastic summer! I will miss you all!

Mrs. Bond ?

casbon@bhasd.org

May 18-28: This week’s theme is WE ARE COLLECTORS!

**Because of the Memorial Day holiday, this project will carry us through to Thursday the 28th. This means you have until that date to complete the activity.** 

MONOCHROMATIC COLLECTIONS

This week we will be exploring contemporary artist Mark Dion. Mark Dion is a New York based artist who creates collections that resemble science laboratories or museums. Below is a short video of Mark Dion creating one of his collections in a museum.

Mark Dion Video

Mark Dion’s work often focuses on nature and how humans affect and change our environment. Many of his collections are things he finds in nature. Below are two collections that he created by collecting trash and litter along beaches. Dion created this work purely from things he found and collected outside in nature. He then built shelves and cabinets to display his collections to create modern “cabinets of curiosities”. Through his work he hopes to make his viewers aware of the impact humans can have on the world around them.

 

For your art activity this week you are going to use Mark Dion’s work as inspiration for your own collection. The only rule is that your collection needs to be monochromatic. In art, monochromatic means shades and tints of ONE color. I have added examples of monochromatic color schemes below. You will notice that all the colors are lighter and darker shades of the same color. The blue example has dark blue, medium blue and light blue shades, but these colors are still all versions of the color blue.

 

For your collection creations, begin by collecting objects that are all the same color. You can collect things around your house or even outside to create a collection. Remember, the colors of the objects can be lighter or darker, but all the objects need to resemble just ONE color. I have added a few examples of monochromatic collections below to give you inspiration for your own!

 

 

Feel free to email me pictures of your creations as I am so excited to see them! In your email please include your name and homeroom teacher ? I am always available via email with any questions you might have. Happy creating artists!

Mrs. Bond ?

casbon@bhasd.org

May 11-16: This week’s theme is DOT DOT DOTS!

YAYOI KUSAMA ART

This week we will be exploring contemporary artist Yayoi Kusama. Yayoi Kusama was born in Japan and is most famous for her use of polka dots in her artwork. Below is a short video about Kusama and her work!

Yayoi Kusama Video

As you saw in the video, Yayoi Kusama is famous for covering anything and everything with dots! When she was a young girl, she had vivid dreams of floating flowers and dots spanning entire fields. To her, the dots represented infinity because they went on forever. She continued with this inspiration throughout her entire art career. When she was 28 years-old she moved to New York City, where she worked tirelessly creating art. Eventually her abstract polka dot paintings were displayed along with famous artists like Andy Warhol. It was from that point on that she became known as the “Polka Dot Princess” and still creates art to this day!

We are going to focus on her some of her sculptures this week, which you saw in the video. A sculpture is a three-dimensional piece of art. Yayoi’s sculptures are so big that they have even been on display outside in parks and in front of museums! I have added a few examples of her flower sculptures below. What do you notice about the sculptures? Do you think they are realistic flowers or abstract?

   

               

For your art activity this week you have two different options. You only need to choose ONE activity to complete!

Option #1: I want you to think about some of the flowers we are beginning to see bloom outside! Begin by creating a flower shape. You can use whatever materials you choose! This means you can simply draw and color your flower. You can cut out and glue a flower. You can even try to create a sculpture of a flower with paper or cardboard! Create a flower however you choose! After you have your flower shape created, choose a design to create the center of your flower. Finally, add some bright colors and polka dots! Yayoi Kusama’s art pieces are famous for their use of very bright colors and lots and lots of dots! I have added drawing instructions for the flower parts below. I also added some example flowers I created by drawing flowers and gluing them onto brightly colored paper. Remember, you can use whatever you want to create your flowers. My examples are just to give you inspiration!

     

     

Option #2: Yayoi Kusama covers anything with polka dots! She has covered pumpkins, flowers, spheres, and even entire rooms with polka dots! Below are a few other examples of her dot creations.

            

For this option find a simple object that you can cover with dots! You could use a piece of fruit, a box, a leaf, a rock, even a shoe! The simpler and less busy the object, the better result you will have. Please ask parent permission first to make sure the object you choose is okay with them!! You can cut dots out of paper and tape or glue them onto an object. You can use stickers to create dots on your object or even pom poms! Use your imagination and whatever materials you can think of, to cover an object with lots and lots of dots! I created a polka dot pear! Use this example as inspiration for your own creation!

Remember you only need to complete ONE of the options this week! Feel free to email me pictures of your creations as I am so excited to see them! In your email please include your name and homeroom teacher ? I am always available via email with any questions you might have. Happy creating artists!

Mrs. Bond ?

casbon@bhasd.org

May 4-8: EXPLORING SURREALISM

MAGRITTE SELF PORTRAITS

This week we will be exploring the art topic of surrealism and famous surrealist artist, Rene Magritte. Surrealism was an art movement where painters made dream-like scenes and showed situations that would be bizarre or impossible in real life.  Magritte’s bold paintings grabbed people’s attention with their strange subject matter and ideas. In his work, everyday things such as apples, birds, floating eyes and people in bowler hats were placed in strange settings. His paintings looked realistic, but the scenes that Magritte created were dreamlike and peculiar.  Below are a few examples of his paintings.

 

                 

Do these ideas all seem a little strange? Floating apples, faces in the sky, and cloud eyeballs certainly do not exist in real life! That is because Rene Magritte painted his dreams! Surrealist artists like Magritte were interested in creating dreamlike fantasy worlds that caused people to pause and think about what they were looking at. They also wanted to inspire people to use their imaginations!

For your activity we are going to focus on Magritte’s painting called “Son of Man”. I have added the painting below, which features a man in an overcoat and a bowler hat standing in front of a low wall. The man’s face is covered by a hovering green apple. This painting is thought to be a self-portrait that Magritte created of himself. Magritte’s intention was to create interest and curiosity for his viewers as they wondered what was hidden behind the green apple. I have also added a few silly versions of this same painting that other artists have created. Do you recognize the characters in the silly paintings and the objects in front of their faces?

I am asking you to hold any object you want in front of your face to create a self-portrait like Magritte’s. You will probably need the help of a parent to take the picture for you! Remember a self-portrait is a picture that you create of yourself. You can choose an object around your house OR you can draw an object on paper and cut it out. Because this is a self-portrait, I want you to choose an object that says something about you! If you play soccer, you could hold a soccer ball in front of your face. If your favorite food is pizza, you can draw a slice of pizza to hold in front of your face. I have added a few examples below to give you ideas and inspirations for your own work. **You do not need to wear a hat to complete your portrait. I am only looking for the object in front of your face**

Feel free to email me pictures of your creations as I am so excited to see them! In your email please include your name and homeroom teacher ? I am always available via email with any questions you might have. Happy creating artists!

Mrs. Bond ?

casbon@bhasd.org

April 27-May 1: This week’s theme is ART AND MATH: EXPLORING SHAPES

SHAPE ROBOTS

This week we will be exploring shapes to create robots! In art we usually talk about two different kinds of shapes: geometric and organic. Geometric shapes are shapes like squares, triangles, rectangles, and circles. These shapes all have even edges and lines that define the shape. Organic shapes are shapes that resemble things found in nature. These shapes have flowing, curved edges and are usually irregularly shaped. Artists use organic shapes and geometric shapes in different ways. When attempting to create a piece that looks natural, flowing, soft or calming, organic shapes are generally the shapes of choice. When attempting to create a sense of hardness or order geometric shapes are used. Below I have placed images of geometric and organic shapes. Which shapes do you think you would use to build a robot?

This week our artist inspiration is an artist named Leonard Zimmerman who also goes by the name “Porkchop”. He creates fun paintings and drawings of robots! In all of his paintings the robots are doing a different activity! Some are making new friends while others are throwing parties! Below are a few examples of his work. Did he use geometric or organic shapes to create his robots?

   

For your activity this week I want you to use geometric shapes to build a robot. As you saw, our artist mainly used geometric shapes to create his robots. I suggest starting with main parts of your robot like the head and body. After you have the basic shape of your robot done you can begin adding things like gears and other parts. I have added a few robot drawing tips below!

   

You can choose to draw your robot on paper, or you could cut shapes out of paper and glue them together. Use whatever materials you have and make your robots whatever colors you want! I also want you to think about what activity your robot will be doing. Will your robot be making a sandwich? Will your robot be playing a sport? I have added a few examples of robot drawings created by kids like you! Use them for inspiration for your own robot art!

   

Feel free to email me pictures of your creations as I am so excited to see them! In your email please include your name and homeroom teacher ? I am always available via email with any questions you might have. Happy creating artists!

Mrs. Bond ?

casbon@bhasd.org

April 20-24: This week’s theme is EARTH ART!

**The weather may not cooperate this week. If you are unable to go outside to create or collect materials, feel free to just sketch your idea or use things you can find inside! You are also welcome to wait until the weather clears to complete this lesson!**

NATURE MANDALAS

In celebration of Earth Day we are going to explore nature art this week! Andy Goldsworthy is a famous British artist who creates sculptures using found objects in nature. Goldsworthy is a naturalist, which means all his art is derived from and connected to nature. His natural sculptures range in materials from leaves, stones, twigs and even ice! Because his sculptures remain in their natural environments and change with the elements, the only way to document Goldsworthy’s art is through photographs. Below you can see a few examples of his sculptures. What natural elements can you spot in each picture? How long do you think it took him to create some of these sculptures and designs?

   

For your activity, take inspiration from Andy Goldsworthy’s art and create your own nature mandala sculpture! Mandala means circle, and various cultures create mandalas as a symbol of peace and balance. Mandalas designs are usually symmetrical, meaning the same on all sides. To make your mandala symmetrical you can divide the circle into four equal parts. Think about creating patterns and repeating designs in your creation. Each space of your circle can repeat the same designs and materials, allowing you to create symmetry. For example, if you place a green leaf in one section of your circle, you should place a green leaf in the other three sections. I have placed a guide of a divided circle below to help you envision how to divide your circle.

Use found materials, preferably ones you find outside in nature. The goal is not to interrupt nature too much by picking plants but use what you can find on the ground like twigs, leaves, and rocks. Remember, we are celebrating the Earth and nature this week! You can make any kind of mandala you choose, but it needs to be circular and symmetrical. designs can remain outside for as long as you choose. You may even want to continue adding to them as you find more natural materials while playing outside or taking walks! I have added a few examples of nature mandalas below for inspiration!

   

      

Feel free to email me pictures of your creations as I am so excited to see them! In your email please include your name and homeroom teacher ? I am always available via email with any questions you might have. Happy creating artists!

Mrs. Bond ?

casbon@bhasd.org

April 13-17: This week’s theme is MAPPING OUR WORLD!

IMAGINARY NEIGHBORHOODS

This week’s activity will begin with a story called “If I Built a House” by Chris Van Dusen. As you listen to the story think about the different buildings and houses that surround your neighborhood! What are some of your favorite buildings in your neighborhood? Click on this link to listen to the story!

Click Here: If I Built A House

Our artist inspiration this week is Bobbi Baugh! She is a contemporary artist that creates mixed media collages. Her artwork stems from things that surround her everyday world and things she wants to remember. The pieces below are examples of houses and places in her neighborhood that she remembers from her childhood.

For your activity I want you to use the ideas from our story to create your own imaginary buildings and neighborhood! We have been spending a lot of time in our homes and neighborhoods the past few weeks. Think about some of your favorite places and buildings in your neighborhood! Why are these buildings your favorite? Is it the color of the building? The shape of the building? Is it the people or things that are inside of the building? Is it because the building reminds you of something you love? Remember, your buildings can be any color and any shape. They are imaginary! Below are few examples of unique buildings that exist in real life to give you inspiration!

 

   

You have two choices this week for creating your imaginary neighborhoods. You can draw your imaginary buildings, OR you can build them!

Drawing Steps:

Start by drawing three different buildings to create your neighborhood. You can add more than three if you choose, but your drawing should have at least three buildings. Use whatever materials you have available at home! If you only have a pencil, think of adding extra details instead of color! I added a picture of the imaginary neighborhood I created below. Some of your buildings in your neighborhood should show the inside of the building, some should show the outside. Remember, you can make your imaginary buildings any shape you want! After you have drawn the basic building shapes, it is time to start adding details. This is where you will decide what kind of rooms you want on the inside, and what details you want to add on the outside.

There is a house in my neighborhood that reminds me of my favorite place, the beach! In my drawing, I created an imaginary beach neighborhood. The houses are all brightly colored, and some are even shaped like shells and the water. I also added a slide that would allow me to slide right into the ocean! I used markers and colored pencils but remember you can use whatever you have on hand! Reminder: If you complete the drawing steps you do not need to complete the building steps unless you want to!

Building Steps:

Use whatever you have available at home to build! Legos, blocks, magna tiles, cereal boxes, books, cardboard. You can use anything you want, just ask your parent’s permission first ? Remember, you are building an imaginary neighborhood so you will need at least three buildings. Think about the things you would want inside your buildings AND outside. I added a picture of the imaginary neighborhood I built below! I would want my house to be colorful, so I used rainbow tiles. I also added a slide on the side of my house so I could slide right into the yard! Reminder: If you complete the building steps you do not need to complete the drawing steps unless you want to!

Feel free to email me pictures of your creations as I am so excited to see them! In your email please include your name and homeroom teacher ? I am always available via email with any questions you might have. Happy creating artists!

Mrs. Bond ?

casbon@bhasd.org

April 6-10: This week’s theme is EXPRESS YOURSELF!

“I AM A WONDER” EXPRESSIVE PORTRAITS

This week’s activity will begin with a story called “We’re All Wonders” by R.J. Palacio. As you listen to the story, I want you to think about what makes YOU a WONDER. Click on the link below the picture of the book to listen to the story!

Click Here: We’re All Wonders

As you saw in the story, Augie was proud of all the things that made him special and unique. All of the things that made him a WONDER. What things did you think of that make YOU a WONDER? In the story Augie was expressing different things that can make people special. Artists use this same idea when they create art! For artists, art is a form of expression. Diana Rosa is a Canadian artist that focuses on “the human story and that all of us are unique and special”. Below are two of her paintings. What special qualities do you think Diana Rosa was trying to express? How do you think the artist wanted people to feel when they viewed these paintings?

     

Diana Rosa “Unititled”                               Diana Rosa “To Be an Artist”

For your activity this week we are going to use inspiration from our story and the idea from Diana Rosa that “all of our stories are unique and special”. Think about some of the ideas you came up with while listening to the story. What are some of your special qualities? What makes you special? What are some of your special talents? If it helps you can begin by making a list. Begin by choosing any size paper you have on hand. White paper will work the best, but any paper you have is perfect. You are then going to create the first part of your drawing. This is going to be a simple outline of your face and hair. Your face will remain white, and your hair style will get colored in solid black. I have added a few examples of how to create this face shape below.

After you have your face and hair drawn, you are going to add one eye. This is to symbolize the cover of the book we read and how Augie views his differences as special and unique. Below is an example of a wonder portrait showing the addition of one eye.

After you add your eye to your face, you are ready to focus on the background. In the background we are going to fill the space with words that describe our unique stories. The words can be any size you want. You can write in cursive or print. It is totally up to you how you choose to make the words. Remember, the words are part of your final art piece. You should think about how they look in the background and take your time creating each word. Again, think about the things that make YOU a WONDER. The things that make you unique. The things that will express who you are! A few examples could be…

I AM KIND

I AM A GREAT ARTIST

I AM A GREAT BROTHER or SISTER

I LOVE MY PET

I TREAT OTHERS WITH RESPECT

I CAN USE MY IMAGINATION

When you are finished, the background behind your face should be filled with words. The final step is also to add colors to your face. You can use anything you choose and anything you have on hand to add color. Below are a few examples of wonder projects created by kids like you! Use them for inspiration!

   

Feel free to email me pictures of your creations as I am so excited to see them! In your email please include your name and homeroom teacher ? I am always available via email with any questions you might have. Happy creating artists!

casbon@bhasd.org

Mrs. Bond ?

March 30-April 3 “Art is All Around You”!

SILLY SANDWICHES AND GIUSEPPE ARCIMBALDO:

Giuseppe Arcimboldo was a famous Italian artist born in 1527. He is most famous for his paintings of human faces made up of vegetables, fruit, flowers, and all sorts of other things. Below are two of his paintings “Autumn Beard Man” and “Vertumnus”. What do you notice? The entire faces are made of things like fruit, vegetables, and even flowers! Look closely at the faces. What do you see? Can you name ten different things Giuseppe used to make the faces?

     

For your activity, use Arcimboldo’s paintings as inspiration for your own art. Arcimboldo was inspired by the things he saw around him. Plants, vegetables and food. Because we have all been spending so much time at home, what favorite food items do you notice around you? If it helps, you can write a list of all your favorite foods. Now, use those favorite things to create your own silly sandwich drawing! You can use whatever drawing materials you have at home. If you have markers or crayons to add color, great! If you just have a pencil or pen to draw, that is great too! Each layer of your sandwich should be a different item. The examples below all include food items, but Arcimboldo also included various plants and flowers. Remember there is no wrong way to build a sandwich!

     

Feel free to email me pictures of your creations as I am so excited to see them! I am always available via email with any questions you might have. Happy creating artists!

Mrs. Bond ?

casbon@bhasd.org